Year 3: The implications of ‘cross-disciplinary’ and psychosocial models of ASPD

Year 3: The implications of ‘cross-disciplinary’ and psychosocial models of ASPD

Perspectives from the first 2 years will feed into this final year as we focus on using cross disciplinary perspectives to understand, and point towards solutions to, contemporary criminological problems of violence. As a number of commentators have pointed out although criminology took a very sociological turn in the middle of the 20th century, there has nevertheless there has been a move towards a psychosocial criminology (Gadd and Jefferson 2007, Jones 2008). It is important to note that we are not simply seeking to promote sociologically, philosophically, or historically informed critiques of the concepts of ASPD, but we are arguing that dialogue between different perspectives will improve our understanding and lead to better solutions.

The central 2 day event will be focused on Gender and violence, asking how contemporary violence can be understood within the psychosocial dynamics of gender. We will look at how concepts of masculinity can be associated with violence. We will also feature the ESRC funded work of co-investigator David Gadd that has focused on understanding male violence in relation to domestic violence and ‘race hate’. We will also look at the topic of the relationship of femininity and violence and will be inviting Estella Weldon (Psychotherapist, IAFP), and Anna Motz (Consultant Forensic Psychologist, Oxen and Bucks NHS Trust). We will also organise an event on Crimes of Hate and Terror, to explore the utility of concepts of disordered personalities to understand the phenomena of crimes that feature publicly expressed hatred including acts of ‘terror’. This theme will also be pursued through a seminar on Education and ‘School Shootings’. This seminar will seek to explore the phenomenon of ‘school shootings’ by trying to understand why this kind of hatred is expressed upon schools; the premise being that these events provide case studies that can help us understand the violent relationship between disordered individuals and their communities.

We will hold a final event that will consist of a Round-up and Review that will consider the next steps for taking this work forward.